cbd for sale in Wisconsin

Cannabinoids CBC and CBG exhibit anti-tumour properties on cancer cells

The test have been carried out by Cannabics Pharmaceuticals at the company’s High Through-put Screening (HTS) facility in Israel. The tests have shown that the cannabinoids CBC (Cannabichromene) and CBG (Cannabigerol) both exhibit anti-tumour properties after being tested on human Gastrointestinal Cancer Cells.

CBC and CBG

CBC is an additional non-psychoactive cannabinoid and is one of the naturally occurring phyto-cannabinoids, bearing a host of potential positive therapeutic qualities and may promote antimicrobial, anti‐inflammatory, analgesic, and neurogenesis activity. It is particularly found in younger cannabis plants, albeit in small quantities.

In these tests, the HTS platform was utilised to screen the necrotic effects of a variety of cannabinoids on human gastrointestinal cancer cells, in addition to other cancer types previously tested.

CBC and CBG were both shown to induce significantly higher rates of necrosis in these cancer cells compared to other cannabinoids.

Dr Yaakov Waksman, the company’s head of cannabidiol research, said: “My working assumption is that these results show that a correlation may exist between a cannabinoid’s Topological Polar Surface Area (TPSA) value and its ability to induce anti-tumour activity, diminishing cancer cell’s viability rates.

“CBC and CBG, as neutral cannabinoids, were both found to have a TPSA value which allows the cannabinoid molecule to penetrate a cancer cell’s membrane, whereas their acidic form (CBCA and CBGA) – do not. This could explain the difference in anti-tumour activity rates demonstrated”.

Dr Eyal Ballan, CTO and Co-Founder, added: “Gastrointestinal cancers are amongst the leading and most wide-spread causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. We are intrigued by the results we have obtained in the lab, and our aim is to consider placing an emphasis on this organ system, and to further explore the differential anti-tumour properties of cannabinoids.

“We believe that these preliminary results vindicate our vision; which is to bring personalisation into cannabinoid-based cancer treatments.”

The Benefits Of Using Hemp In The Construction And Textile Industries

Ever since the cannabis legalization process began to gain global momentum, much has been said about its medicinal and therapeutic potential, as well as the huge market that awaits behind the doors of adult-use regulation.

However, the cannabis plant has even greater potential, of which today we’re seeing but the tip of the iceberg. Hemp is a subspecies of the cannabis plant; it lacks most of marijuana’s psychoactive effects but can be used as raw material for several industries -such as textile and construction.

In fact, industrial sales are expected to triple in the next 7 years, rising from $4.71 billion in 2019 to $15.26 billion in 2027.

Reducing The Carbon Footprint

Steve DeAngelo, one of the most recognized cannabis activists of the last decades, says that hemp has the ability to replace virtually any petroleum product. 

“Hemp can be grown without pesticides. Captures 22 tons of atmospheric carbon per hectare. It is a powerful phytoremediator that extracts industrial poisons from contaminated soil. And, likewise, it is a powerful tool to control erosion and remedy unproductive or marginally productive lands,” says DeAngelo. And adds: “We are only now harnessing the industrial hemp plant’s potential as a rotating crop with regenerative agriculture qualities.”

The Textile Industry

Hemp fabric has been around for a long time, from Rembrandt’s canvases to the sails in Columbus’s caravels. Now, the textile industry is strongly experiencing hemp’s disruption, especially as a replacement for cotton.

The material can be processed to be lightweight, soft, breathable, and durable, replacing most cotton applications in the textile industry. Considering that cotton represents 43% of all fibers used for clothing and textiles worldwide, hemp has huge possibilities ahead.

For instance, iconic jeans company Levi’s recently announced a pilot project to replace 27% of its denim’s cotton with hemp, as part of an overall sustainability push. Why? Cotton requires much more water, pesticides, and soil to be grown than hemp.

4 Things to Know About the FDA’s C BD Guidance

When 2019 began, it was expected to be an incredibly “green” year for the cannabis industry. Canada had just commenced recreational weed sales in October 2018; higher-margin derivative products were expected to hit dispensary shelves in Canada soon thereafter; and President Trump had just signed the farm bill into law, thereby legalizing the industrial production of hemp and hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD).

Arguably, the greatest excitement surrounded CBD, the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid that’s best known for its perceived medical benefits. Since CBD doesn’t get users high, there’s a considerably broader patient pool for infused products than anything marijuana related. And it also doesn’t hurt that the U.S. population is considerably larger than Canada, providing a juicier opportunity for the CBD industry.

Four vials of cannabinoid-rich liquid lined up on a counter.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

Moreover, with President Trump signing the farm bill into law, it allowed general stores, such as pharmacies and grocers, the opportunity to carry hemp-derived CBD products. In other words, no longer are CBD products carried only in cannabis dispensaries. This more encompassing retail presence should provide a boost to industry sales.

According to the Brightfield Group, U.S. CBD product sales are expected to increase from around a pedestrian $600 million in 2018 to $23.7 billion by 2023. For those of you keeping score at home, this is, indeed, a compound annual growth rate of more than 100% per year over a five-year stretch. This makes CBD a much faster-growing niche than cannabis as a whole.

The FDA lays the hammer down on CBD

And yet, this rapidly growing niche is clouded in worry following a Nov. 25 consumer update from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To quickly summarize the consumer update, the FDA:

  • Noted that CBD has the potential to harm consumers.
  • Pointed out that CBD has the potential to cause side effects that might not immediately be noticed by consumers.
  • Admitted that there are numerous important aspects about CBD that the agency doesn’t know.
A lab researcher in a white coat closely examining a beaker filled with cannabinoid-rich liquid.

IMAGE SOURCE: GW PHARMACEUTICALS.

In particular, the FDA alluded to the only cannabis-derived drug, GW Pharmaceuticals‘ (NASDAQ:GWPH) Epidiolex, as evidence of these bullet points. Despite GW Pharmaceuticals’ lead drug being approved as a treatment for two rare forms of childhood-onset epilepsy in June 2018, Epidiolex was also shown to cause liver injury during clinical studies in some patients. Again, this risk didn’t outweigh the benefits GW Pharmaceuticals’ drug provided in terms of reducing seizure frequency from baseline, but it demonstrates in the eyes of the FDA that CBD doesn’t have a clean bill of health.

This FDA consumer update comes as the agency has been reviewing the compound as an additive to food, beverages, and dietary supplements. The FDA’s findings, based on the update, suggest that the agency is not going to grant companies the ability to add CBD to food, beverages, or dietary supplements at this time. And, as you can imagine, this news wasn’t taken well by Wall Street and investors.

Four things you should know about the FDA’s consumer update on CBD

However, it’s important for investors to understand that this FDA update isn’t as bad as it initially sounds. Here are four important takeaways from the FDA’s CBD guidelines.

1. This move had been telegraphed for months

For starters, the FDA’s consumer update that was critical of CBD’s safety could be seen coming months in advance. Remember, the agency never said it would release concrete guidelines by late summer or early fall. Instead, it only promised to provide an update on the progress it was making in reviewing data and testimony, which it has now done.

Additionally, the FDA hasn’t been shy about cracking down on misleading health claims when it comes to CBD. In July, Curaleaf Holdings (OTC:CURLF), the largest multistate operator in the U.S. by market cap, wound up receiving a warning letter regarding unsubstantiated claims for a variety of CBD products. Even though Curaleaf was quick to respond to these deficiencies, it still wound up costing the company a potentially lucrative distribution deal with CVS Health.

A researcher in a white lab coat making notes on a clipboard in the middle of a hemp farm.

How mainstream media botched the vape lung story

David Bienenstock

In 1989, a mysterious figure known as Dr. Lunglife sent High Times a set of detailed instructions for transforming a handful of easily obtained equipment into a low cost vaporizer. He included a guide to making a highly potent cannabis concentrate that optimized the contraption’s effectiveness.

Soon thereafter, the magazine published a letter to the editor from K.O. of Clarksville, Mississippi:

Just thought I’d let you know I built one of Dr. Lunglife’s vaporizers. Tell the good doctor that it has worked well for me. Now if I can just get a really long extension cord for the Hash Bash in Ann Arbor.

30 years of user data on vaping

Clearly, many cannabis enthusiasts must have started experimenting with vaporization around this same time.

Commercial products required a little more time to make it to market. The first Volcano vaporizer, made by Storz & Bickel, appeared in the US in 2003. The first pen-size vaporizers appeared around 2006. Cannabis vape pens hit the American scene starting around 2010.

That gives us—at the very least—a solid three decades of anecdotal user data to work with when evaluating any potential harms involved.

So when a rash of people started getting seriously or even fatally ill after using vape pens earlier this year, it was obvious that something other than cannabis must be the culprit. The overwhelming number of cases of VAPI, vaping associated pulmonary injury, have been attributed to counterfeit products produced and distributed illegally without any regulatory oversight whatsoever.

Tainted illegal THC pens are suspect

At Leafly, our reporting team tracked these dangerous counterfeit pens from production to sale. We found a supply chain operating wholly outside the law and with a blatant disregard for public health. Theories on what’s causing VAPI range from dangerous additives to poorly manufactured pens, or possibly some combination of the two. No evidence has emerged to show THC, CBD, or any other cannabinoid is to blame.

BIG Announcement

Dear Valued Clients, Colleagues and Friends,

I’m writing today to inform you of an important change in the structure of One Health WI. As of last Friday, my business partner and I have mutually agreed to part ways. As always, you can count on me to continue to deliver the highest quality products at the best prices, just with a new look and new name! I’m excited to introduce you to: Native Roots Hemp !

As our new company continues to grow, so will our brand with a new look and feel. In the coming weeks you’ll see our online and print presence update with the new logo and information.

Many of you know that I am originally from Algoma, WI and have been very excited to move my family “back to my roots” as we launched our CBD business. We’ve already helped thousands of people across the country to feel better through our quality products and we’re looking forward to having our company’s name and brand signify getting “back to our roots” as well !

As our team at Native Roots Hemp continues to work with my family in Brussels, WI, who are farmers in the hemp industry, as well as our other valued suppliers from the past, rest assured you will continue to receive the highest quality products in the country, as you have since September, 2018.

Thank you for trusting us. You are all like family to our team and we look forward to continuing to partner with you on your wellness journey!

Please join me at the Luxemburg Pharmacy today, August 28th, from 8-2 for FREE samples and to answer any questions you may have.

See you soon!

Warmest regards,

Stacy Deprey-Purper, CEO
Native Roots Hemp
www.NativeRootsHemp.com

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